Brexit

Brexit Part 2: On the way to a "No Deal"

If we compare today's Brexit with our two past examples of the English civil war and Henry VIIIs reformation we find an anomaly in the new British cycle. At the bottom of the British national cycle post-1970 there was a continuity of governance unseen in past cycles due to the framework of the super western Christian empire. Whilst continuity accelerated Britain's recovery time considerably, its' downside was that the legacy leadership structures of the nation remained in place, rather than evolving through a period of chaos which would have allowed new leadership to rise to the fore.

Brexit Part 1: Historical Perspectives

The British parliament is now approaching a historic moment. It is about to vote on May’s Chequers plan for Brexit.

It therefore seems an appropriate time to review the ‘Five Stages of Empire Principals’ to better understand the social forces at work in British society and the likely outcomes ahead.

Brexit Part XXIX: Boris for PM and the inevitable sinking of the EU

As we have often described in the context of Breaking the Code of History, Prime Minister May falls into the model of a dictator post a regional civil war, employing the energy of force and coercion to keep both previously warring factions together for the sake of the nation’s future. However, May does not have the force or energy to pull this role off. Indeed, she could be described as the accidental dictator, whose delusional self-image got the better of everyone else’s judgement.

Brexit Part XXVIII: May's wobble

The closure of the difference between the polls of the Conservatives and Labour has caused great consternation to those who thought it would be a landslide victory. However, the reason is very simple. May has tried to follow the path of Blair and Cameron in occupying the centre ground when the vast majority of the electorate requires a move to the right with the associated wealth creation policies.

Brexit Part XXVII: May calling a general election

Prime Minister May’s call for an election should not have taken anyone by surprise. The surprise was that she had not announced it sooner. The Conservatives were not elected with May as their leader and she did not want to make the same mistake as Gordon Brown who was never endorsed by the people and served out an ignominious short term as PM. Following such a divisive referendum, May and the Conservatives need a resounding mandate to push through the Brexit negotiations using the risk of a no-deal outcome as the ultimate bargaining chip.

Brexit Part XXIV: The state of the nation? Part I

On Wednesday, March 29th, Britain will once more officially begin to chart its own course as a sovereign nation. 288 Days after the famous Brexit referendum vote, Sir Tim Barrow, the British Representative to the EU, will hand a letter from the Prime Minister, Mrs May to Donald Tusk, the President of the European Council. The contents will notify the 27 members of the EU that Britain is commencing its exit process outlined in Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

Brexit Part XXIII: Brexit and Sterling

The current Sterling crisis which the press claims is due to Brexit is receiving considerable press coverage. Indeed, the sentiment on the future of the Sterling is exceptionally bearish.

Brexit Part XXII: Brexit taking shape

When one considers the lightning and decisive change in power following the EU referendum, one can only interpret the shift as a massive affirmation of Britain's democratic process.

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